Spring bean life cycle call back Methods Example

Spring framework provides bean life cycle call back methods to perform some additional tasks which you may want to perform when a bean is initiated or created or when a bean is about to get destroyed. Therefore you can run a method which will do some initialization process during bean initialization and you can run another method which will do some clean up process just before a bean gets destroyed.

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InitializingBean and DisposableBean in Spring

Spring InitializingBean and DisposableBean are the interfaces used in life cycle of Spring beans management. Each of these interfaces has only one method. InitializingBean has a method called afterPropertiesSet() and DisposableBean has a method called destroy(). Spring container runs the method afterPropertiesSet() once the bean properties have been set and Spring container runs destroy() method once Spring container releases the bean.

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Custom init() and destroy() methods in Spring

Introduction In this tutorial we will discuss on Spring custom init() and destroy() methods. These methods are call back methods which used in Spring life cycle. You can use these methods to to some initialization and clean up jobs just after the bean is created by the Spring container or just before the bean is about to be destroyed by the Spring container respectively.

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Spring @PostConstruct and @PreDestroy Example

In this tutorial I will show you how we can use @PostConstruct and @PreDestroy annotation in Spring framework. @PostConstruct and @PreDestroy annotations are generally considered best practices for receiving life cycle callbacks in a modern Spring application. Using these annotations means that our beans are not coupled to Spring specific interfaces. Sometimes we need to load some data or perform initialization work after all necessary properties on the bean have been set by the container. In this example we will load data from database during application startup and set that…

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Life cycle of JavaServer Faces (JSF)

In Java Server Faces (JSF) the client makes an HTTP request for the page, and the server responds with the page translated to HTML. However, the Java Server Faces life cycle is split up into multiple phases in order to support the sophisticated UI (User Interface) component model. This model requires that component data be converted and validated, component events be handled, and component data be propagated to beans in an orderly fashion. A Java Server Faces page represented by a tree of UI components, called a view. During the…

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